Jabberwockey Blues

Jabberwockey Blues

Barbara Arrowsmith-Young [ Neurogenesis ] My life and my work has been an exploration of the territory of the human brain, how it makes us uniquely who we are. Because when we think about our brain, it filters our perceptions of ourselves and our understanding of ourselves, our understanding of other people, our understanding of the world, and our understanding of our relationship

Neurogenesis

Neurogenesis

Sandrine Thuret [ Neurogenesis ] Can we, as adults, grow new neurons? There’s still some confusion about that question, as this is a fairly new field of research. For example, I was talking to one of my colleagues, Robert, who is an oncologist, and he was telling me, “Sandrine, this is puzzling. Some of my patients that have been told they are cured

Epigenetics

Epigenetics

Nessa Carey [ Neurogenesis, Bias Networks ] You can’t talk about epigenetics without talking about genetics. This is the representation of the famous DNA double helix and back in 2001, when the human genome sequence was first released, there was this huge hoopla about it and some quite entertaining things were said. There was this big press conference and that quote at the

Barbara Oakley

Barbara Oakley

Barbara Oakley [ Neurogenesis ] I’d like to begin by telling you a little story. This story is about– well, I think all of us love to watch other people, right? To some greater or lesser extent.  I love people watching. I have to tell you about this one guy who was one of the most interesting people I’ve ever watched. This was

How To Grow Your Brain

How To Grow Your Brain

Sal Khan [ Neurogenesis ] We know that our brain is what makes us us. It’s what does all of our thinking. It’s what processes all of the sensory input from the outside world and creates this reality in our brain that we experience. It is us. The question is: what is the brain actually made up of? It’s primarily made up of

Forgetting Forgetting

Forgetting Forgetting

Henry Roediger [ Neurogenesis ] points out that Psychologists have been studying learning and memory with experimental methods for roughly 130 years — since Hermann Ebbinghaus compiled his Curve of Forgetting experiments. What changes have been translated from Basic Research into widespread educational applications? What difference has all this research made for the average 4th grader? None. Nothing at all has changed in