Bias Networks

Bias Networks

David R. Williams [ Harvard ] An article in the Yale Alumni Magazine told the story of Clyde Murphy, a black man who was a member of the Class of 1970. Clyde was a success story. After Yale and a law degree from Columbia, Clyde spent the next 30 years as one of America’s top civil rights lawyers. He was also a great

Story Felling

Story Felling

Stacy Smith [ TED ] Today, I want to tell you about a pressing social issue. Now, it’s not nuclear arms, it’s not immigration, and it’s not malaria. I’m here to talk about movies. Now, in all seriousness, movies are actually really important. In film, we can be wildly entertained, and we can also be transported through storytelling. Storytelling is so important. Stories

Machine Intelligence

Machine Intelligence

Zeynep Tufekci [ TED Summit ] I started my first job as a computer programmer in my very first year of college — basically, as a teenager. Soon after I started working, writing software in a company, a manager who worked at the company came down to where I was, and he whispered to me, “Can he tell if I’m lying?” There was

Discovery Channeling

Discovery Channeling

Mahzarin Banaji (Harvard University) discusses the ways in which we are not good at knowing our own hidden prejudices and preferences. But those beliefs shape how we collaborate, run businesses, and assess colleagues. Learn about the latest research on the human “blindspot” and why businesses are using it to change their culture. FEATURED IMAGE CREDIT: Stephen Bowler

Soberly Reflecting

Soberly Reflecting

Bryan Stevenson [ Melbourne Law School ] one of America’s leading human rights lawyers and clinical law professors, offered his reflections and vision on how to confront injustice and build a just society at a public lecture at Melbourne Law School on 19 February 2015. FEATURED IMAGE CREDIT: Pat David

Weapons of Math Destruction

Weapons of Math Destruction

Kathy O’Neil [ PDF 15 ] Imagine that you’re seeing Mathematics. I stole this from my husband’s desk yesterday. Mathematicians use notation like that — hope you can see it — because mathematicians are lazy. Mathematicians use notation as shorthand for much more complicated things, that they’d have to write out with words, and it takes too long to do that — and

Confronting Injustice

Confronting Injustice

Bryan Stevenson [ SXSW ] — The United States is a very different country that it was 30 years ago. In 1970, we had a prison population of 200,000 and today we have a prison population of 2.3 Million. The United States now has the largest prison population in the world. 1 in 6 male Latino babies and 1 in 3 male Black